Looking for easier tire installation

Smurf2

100 W
Joined
Jun 25, 2022
Messages
140
I have M bike, converted in E-bike. Current installed Cross King wired 26".

The big problem I have is that when puncture a tire, I want change it myself (at field), but that is not possible. So, I no other options and calls home to someone pick up me with a car. Which is really frustrating.

My father have experience in removing tires and he does that with
crowbar and screwdriver on old way. He never saw that hardly remove tires in his live, and me too... So, I am helping him and holding tire when he barely succeeds remove it!

My printed plastic tire removal tool (two of them) broken because that force. No way with that.

My idea is now looking new tires which can go easier.
But, in other hand, I had to replace first rim (same size) because disc brake installing, which seems it's a little smaller. And do you know how I remove/installed a tire? ONLY BY HANDS! Now I am so confused!

I watched video when someone said that tires, even are 26", can be smaller and bigger. And problem start when we bought the biggest rim and the smallest tire! ?

Now I am sure that Chinese rear motor hub rim is slightly bigger than front rim. And tires are smallest, (think that I saw in feedbacks that user talks that Continental it goes hard on rim).

So, because I had 6 times REAR puncture in 16 months, it is necessary to do something about easier install/remove tires from rim.

(If want, see Thread about my punctures).
(How I am drive then? Check here in details).

Which tire brands are slightly bigger? Does it help if buy tubeless tire and drive with inner tube like now?
 
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Screwdrivers will scratch the rim and puncture tubes, unless they are really old with wide dull blades that are rounded off.. I use steel core bicycle tire irons with a plastic exterior. Plastic levers will break.

You might consider tires with folding kevlar beads instead of wire beads. I find they seem to go on/off easiy and are lighter.

One problem with DIY ebikes is it takes more tools/time to remove torque arms on hub motors. Also have to carry the necessary wrench for the axle nuts. Finally need to make sure the display isn't damaged when the bike is flipped over. I refuse to buy the silly handlebar jacks sold for that purpose which are more junk to carry. I'll never use tire inserts either.

It's also good to have your wheels trued so you can seat the wheel in the bottom of the dropouts and it will not need the disk or rim brakes re-aligned. Less work in the field. If you use a hub motor. aa connector on motor cable is handy. Only my first ebike has a straight cable to the controller, but I've never had a flat on that bike, not in 8 years.
 
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Good plastic or plastic coated tire levels help but the real trick is just getting the bead into the well in the rim on the opposite side you're trying to remove and making sure it stays there. This also means that different rims will be harder or easier not based on the size of the rim but based on the depth of the well in the center of the rim.
 
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Screwdrivers will scratch the rim and puncture tubes
Yes I know for that. My father scratch rim, but never puncture tire with crowbar and screwdriver.

takes more tools/time to remove torque arms on hub motors. Also have to carry the necessary wrench for the axle nuts.
In many cases, don't need to remove all wheel from axis. If tire can go easy out, you can remove it and patch on that way.

You might consider tires with folding kevlar beads instead of wire beads
Yes, I can buy folding tire (if you mean that goes easier out) Only one (rear) is needed. Can that folding tire fall off from rim on big pressure?

"but the real trick is just getting the bead into the well in the rim on the opposite side you're trying to remove and making sure it stays there.
Yes we know that. Even with that it is very very tense.
As you can see on picture, this type of rim is almost 'flat', and without big middle channel where you can push tire. Maybe that is reason.
 
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Yeah, that's the narrowest width rim and your pictures are all big, wide knobby mtb tires. Narrower tires would fit your rim better.

For getting tires on, I love my tire jack, personally:

Clip it on the rim and side around the wheel. Done.

Been trying to find a knock off of the Park Tools tire seating tool too:

Tried this, but doesn't work well:

I also use Flat Out and super thick tubes, so rarely get a flat.
 
20231118_185613.jpg

Also, this is front rim 26" with deeper channel, and I removed same tire with hands.

@Inanek Thanks for tools.
 
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Looks like you found your answer! :)
Yes, but I can't simply change rear rim because I have hub motor on it.
So, if I will know that folding tire will go easier, or if you know that exist a little bigger tire, will be good.

First I will buy levers in local shop and try change tire on work which waiting me there (if I am not broken them all).
 
I notice that to, sometimes the tire is a very tight fit getting that last little bit onto the rim and seated.
Rims have different erd's
 
When installing auto and motorcycle tires the mechanic will use some form of lube to help ease the tire on to the rim.
Soapy water is common but there are specialized products for the task.
For tubeless motorcycle tires, "Xtra seal bead sealer" is super slippery for ease of installation and when dried prevents any leaks between tire and rim.

If the rim shape doesn't have a deep well in the design then any brand tire may have installation trouble.
 
If the rim shape doesn't have a deep well in the design then any brand tire may have installation trouble.

I got idea! Can be problem a red strip (post #4) on my rim? Maybe my rim have deep shape, but maybe strip is too hard and makes flat surfaces?

I don't know why someone would make a rim without that channel, no sense to me. I will check next time how looks bellow red strip, and maybe change some softer strip :)
 
Plenty of rims don't have the channel, unfortunately.

The strip is there to keep your tube from being damaged by the nipple holes or nipples or spoke threads, or if tubeless is there to seal the rim so air doesn't leak out thru those, so you generally don't want to mess around with it unless there is something wrong with it that is keeping it from doing it's job.
 
Plenty of rims don't have the channel, unfortunately.

The strip is there to keep your tube from being damaged by the nipple holes or nipples or spoke threads, or if tubeless is there to seal the rim so air doesn't leak out thru those, so you generally don't want to mess around with it unless there is something wrong with it that is keeping it from doing it's job.
I have a fat tire rim that has a very thick plastic rim strip. If it isn't absolutely perfectl.y aligned with the channel, the edges impede the tire bead when you try and disengage it from rim and push it towards the centre. It helps to carefully trim the edge of the rim strip and keep the edge from sticking up.

Some of the modern tubeless rims are engineered to grip the bead very tightly. If its a tight wire bead it can be very difficult to install the tire and almost impossible to remove. A more supple kevlar bead is much better, if you can find one.
 
This chart claims there's a 571mm option instead of 559mm if you want to try the next size up inner diameter:

E.g.:

If you have the old tire or the rim has numbers on it, could help figure out something compatible too.

That said, this rim width chart says 2" tires on a 19mm wide rim is the extreme edge of compatibility:

So might be better off just getting 1.25" wide tires instead of 2" wide. The tire will fight you less trying to squeeze the beads into the center before you inflate the tube.
 
I got idea! Can be problem a red strip (post #4) on my rim? Maybe my rim have deep shape, but maybe strip is too hard and makes flat surfaces?

I don't know why someone would make a rim without that channel, no sense to me. I will check next time how looks bellow red strip, and maybe change some softer strip :)
Velox brand is a reliable "go to" brand of rim tape however it is a little thicker than other brands.
Richey rim tape is thinner and lighter which may help with getting tough tires on the rim.
A good strategy for tough to fit tires is to use clamps to pinch the tire together on the opposite side of the where your trying to pull the tire over the rim.
What your doing is making sure both beads of the tire are fully seated in the center "well" of the rim as this allows the most stretch to pull over the rim.
Granted, this is a workshop method and not tools to carry on the bike.

1964758_1.jpg
 
Inanek said:
This chart claims there's a 571mm option instead of 559mm if you want to try the next size up inner diameter:
Thanks guys for advices.
Thanks @Inanek, that is what I need! But it seems not too much bigger dimensions a viable on market.
Point Blur_Nov282023_171928.jpg
I took the tires off:
After watching a lot of tutorials, I was barely able to get the tire out somehow. Stuck in this position. No way that I can pull the lever left/right around the rim (like with the "easy" tires).

So I pushed the left lever as hard as possible behind the spoke and stretched the tire outwards (got a little space), moved the left lever a couple of millimeters to the left (in that space) and repeated the process. Then I could finally pull the lever around the entire edge.

I've taken off some other tires before, but guys, you have to trust me, these tires go very hard from that rim.
 
This chart claims there's a 571mm option instead of 559mm if you want to try the next size up inner diameter:

DO NOT use the wrong tire size. Even 3mm difference (like the difference between "700D" on 1990s GT bikes versus 650A on traditional 3 speed roadsters) will result in a tire that either refuses to come off the rim once installed, or else blows off before full tire pressure is reached. 12mm difference means the larger tire won't even try to engage the smaller rim.

There are small differences between different brands of tire in the same size, with some brands having reputations for being slightly tighter or looser than average.

Really, this whole thread comes down to problems with technique and quirks of tire construction.

To get a bicycle tire on or off, the key is to move the wire bead to the deepest part of the rim channel all the way around except at the one spot where you're lifting it off. If you do this, it always works; you'll rarely need a lever or anything. If you don't, it will always be a fight.

Some tires like Marathon Plus want to open up into a wide C-shaped cross section, and it's hard to convince the bead to move to the center of the rim and stay there. That doesn't mean the tire is too tight. It only makes it tricky to position it where it will come off. Amberwolf's zip tie or toe strap technique and PaPaSteve's clamp method are ways of insisting with a stubborn tire that it stay in the deep part of the rim channel.

Also, some rims are shallower in the center than others. Particularly double walled rims from the '80s, with low section heights, tend to be quite flat across the bottom and to make tire changes difficult. Single walled rims always have a nice deep center, and deep section double walled rims usually have a more generous relief than shallow ones.

One thing some people do to confound themselves is to install more than one rim strip. That raises up the deep part of the rim and gets in the way of buying some slack to lift the bead off. Best, if you have trouble changing tires, is to use a single, thin, tight fitting rim strip-- textile not rubber.
 
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I've been using narrow fiber-reinforced packing tape as a rim strip, for decades - low profile, lightweight, stays in place, and very low cost per wheel.
 
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@Chalo, you can delete one post, because you doubled it.
Chalo said: There are small differences between different brands
Exactly that! Do you know maybe where can I find accurate data about brands sizes, or some feedback users?

Also, I have 1 used Schwalbe* tire, which I tested to 2 others rim which not using, and not problem to take off tire. Maybe I can try next time (on flat) put that tire on problematic rim.
Chalo said: To get a bicycle tire on or off, the key is to move the wire bead to the deepest part of the rim channel all the way around except at the one spot where you're lifting it off. If you do this, it always works;
I said that I did that. But I said also that my "channel" is "flat" on that rim. On front rim I have that deeper channel and no problem take off a tire. But on this rim is very very hard.
Chalo said: Best, if you have trouble changing tires, is to use a single, thin, tight fitting rim strip-- textile not rubber.
This is great advice! I will check that next time. Unfortunately, today on work place did not have too much time and have 1 side of tire in, so it was difficult to check strip and channel bellow strip. But as I remember, it seems very strong, and maybe too thick. I hope that is not from plastic.

* -edited
 
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Do we know the actual size of the problem rim, though? Just searching m-bikeshop.com and 650B shows they sometimes use that bizarre, also sometimes called 26", size in a mullet bike:
eOne-Sixty is the premium model of the Merida eBike range. It has been the winner of all tests for three generations, collecting accolades along the way and is always in the spotlight. The mix of wheel sizes gives them precise handling, fantastic handling over obstacles with maximum traction. Front wheel 29er with a tire of 2.4" it is combined with the rear wheel 650B, equipped with a slightly wider tire of 2.6". The perfect combination of precision, playfulness and traction. The Shimano e-Tube app allows you to adjust the power delivery according to your riding style, and even set two profiles, one for intensive and the other for recreational riding.
 
@Chalo, you can delete one post, because you doubled it.

Exactly that! Do you know maybe where can I find accurate data about brands sizes, or some feedback users?

I find that Kenda and CST tires both tend to be pretty forgiving and consistent. Panaracer, Continental, and Bontrager have the reputation of being tight fitting.
 
Yeah, that's the narrowest width rim and your pictures are all big, wide knobby mtb tires. Narrower tires would fit your rim better.

For getting tires on, I love my tire jack, personally:

Clip it on the rim and side around the wheel. Done.

Been trying to find a knock off of the Park Tools tire seating tool too:

Tried this, but doesn't work well:

I also use Flat Out and super thick tubes, so rarely get a flat.
Your tire jack (Rehook Tyre Glider) looks interesting. Does it replace good tire levers (I have 4 metal ones) in all situations? The ad's videos make it look too easy. In what situation is the Rehook Tyre Glider not good enough and you'd need something like the Park Tool PTS-1 Tire Seating Pliers?
 
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Thanks guys for advices.
Thanks @Inanek, that is what I need! But it seems not too much bigger dimensions a viable on market.
View attachment 343468
I took the tires off:
After watching a lot of tutorials, I was barely able to get the tire out somehow. Stuck in this position. No way that I can pull the lever left/right around the rim (like with the "easy" tires).

So I pushed the left lever as hard as possible behind the spoke and stretched the tire outwards (got a little space), moved the left lever a couple of millimeters to the left (in that space) and repeated the process. Then I could finally pull the lever around the entire edge.

I've taken off some other tires before, but guys, you have to trust me, these tires go very hard from that rim.
You have 3 levers in and stuck. If you had one more lever, I think you would have gotten the tire out without problems.

Are those plastic or plastic over metal levers? I found plastic only levers not strong enough (ones I had were nylon). They bend and slip off the tire. I replaced them with 4 metal levers. No more problems getting tires on/ off.
 
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