MXUS 3000 Hub Motor - V1 V2 V3

Yeah ive replaced phase wires a few times and its always a pain.

Thats why being able to order the motor with whatever axle, plus 9 gauge phase wires from the factory was such a benefit. They say it has dual halls, 9 gauge and a temp sensor- along with my custom 175mm axle width. Not only that it was cheaper to have them lace it into a 21 dirtbike rim than it would have been for me to do it myself. Saved me hours and hours of time between the lacing and phase wires, plus it was cheaper and factory. I'll take pictures and repost when it arrives if all is well, fingers crossed.

***Curious is ur 3k mxus a 12mm or 14mm axle?
Many will make their online store try and look like the official maker, going as far as stealing the pictures.

These guys are the official.
Alibaba - Changzhou Mxus Imp.&Exp. Co., Ltd.

I would not know if they dabble with multiple stores on the same platform, I doubt it. That seems like something a smaller player would do. Maybe they just order their hubs from Changzhou Mxus and upgrade the hubs to fit larger wires or different dropout widths.

With 10awg wire, through the hub 3kw mxus hub I got was quite a challenge without the hall wires. If you could find wire with thinner insulation to fit inside the axle hole, it may still be a very tight squeeze, even without the hall sense wires. Obviously you want to string the thinner hall sense wires through the hole before you try to stuff the bigger wire through. PTFE teflon wire is quite stiff (harder to bend around the corner in the axle), but the insulation jacket is thick, strong and sturdy. I ground down the sharp edges of the axle entrance (inside the hub) and the exit where the wires come out. If your still having trouble stuffing wire, use pliers, use a lubricant of some sort. The first phase wire is the easiest, the third phase wire was always the hardest. I used 12awg ptfe teflon. Some people used the stock phase wires, snipped the phases at the exit with enough room to attach way thicker phase wires, they did not notice much performance downgrade. But then again they werent speedaholics, or going for max efficiency or anything, they were just having fun with their 3kw hubs in Atlanta using Lipo and testing lipo, his content/posts were quite good - Icecube57
just use 10 awg silicone silver plated wire from rc store and then remove the silicone insulation and replace it with shrink, voila !
 
Suringmax (3000w and 5000w) appears to be a clone or rebrand of the mxus 3k and 5k. They have an aliexpress store (suringmax official store), where they sell direct to consumer 1 unit at time. They appear to be the factory as they allow significant customization. On some of their listings they have MXUS and Suringmax both listed- as if its the same manufacturer but im not sure- both are 45h motors, same KV, same weight, etc.

I just ordered a custom motor from them. They had steel or aluminum core, .35mm lamination, factory installed temp sensor, 6.0mm2 9awg phase wires, different KV options, plus they sell the motor in different dropout widths, 135mm as well as 175mm and 190mm etc- so that you are not limited at 135mm frames. They also do extremely affordable lacing with bicycle, fatbike and motorcycle wheel options.

- Nicely spec'd motor/customized
- Any dropout width available
- Any rim/lacing available

I just ordered and paid $515 total with shipping/tax for the motor + all factory modifications + 21 moto rim + lacing + shipping + tax.

Edit Received: They sent it fedex, express, not sure if thats normal or if they did me a favor but it got here in less than a week from shipping. Spokes are nice and tight with no exposed threads and none sticking through the inside of the nipple, looks well built. Picture attached comparing phase wires to 12awg and 14awg, they are noticeably larger. 16mm wide axle. Very happy with it.
View attachment 335935

i receive mine from surringmax and i am verry happy and each of the phase wire are 3.1mm thick but they look smaller than 10awg more like 12awg ,
 
Suringmax (3000w and 5000w) appears to be a clone or rebrand of the mxus 3k and 5k. They have an aliexpress store (suringmax official store), where they sell direct to consumer 1 unit at time. They appear to be the factory as they allow significant customization. On some of their listings they have MXUS and Suringmax both listed- as if its the same manufacturer but im not sure- both are 45h motors, same KV, same weight, etc.

I just ordered a custom motor from them. They had steel or aluminum core, .35mm lamination, factory installed temp sensor, 6.0mm2 9awg phase wires, different KV options, plus they sell the motor in different dropout widths, 135mm as well as 175mm and 190mm etc- so that you are not limited at 135mm frames. They also do extremely affordable lacing with bicycle, fatbike and motorcycle wheel options.

- Nicely spec'd motor/customized
- Any dropout width available
- Any rim/lacing available

I just ordered and paid $515 total with shipping/tax for the motor + all factory modifications + 21 moto rim + lacing + shipping + tax.

Edit Received: They sent it fedex, express, not sure if thats normal or if they did me a favor but it got here in less than a week from shipping. Spokes are nice and tight with no exposed threads and none sticking through the inside of the nipple, looks well built. Picture attached comparing phase wires to 12awg and 14awg, they are noticeably larger. 16mm wide axle. Very happy with it.
View attachment 335935

i just look at your curvy motor cover and it look like its a old version they send you, because you should have a flat cover
 
i receive mine from surringmax and i am verry happy and each of the phase wire are 3.1mm thick but they look smaller than 10awg more like 12awg ,
I posted a picture of the phase wires up close, suring max vs 12awg (grin L1019 phase wires)- the attached photo below the main photo. The picture may not do it justice but they are most certainly much larger than the 12awg. They are advertised as 9awg, thats about what they look like to me, but not 100% sure.
 
I posted a picture of the phase wires up close, suring max vs 12awg (grin L1019 phase wires)- the attached photo below the main photo. The picture may not do it justice but they are most certainly much larger than the 12awg. They are advertised as 9awg, thats about what they look like to me, but not 100% sure.
 
after resetting my caliper the phase wires diameter was 3.12mm not 3.28mm with the insulation, that mean if i remove the insulation it will be maybe 2.5mm and 2.5mm is about 11awg ? if i am wrong somebody can answer this question
 

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after resetting my caliper the phase wires diameter was 3.12mm not 3.28mm with the insulation, that mean if i remove the insulation it will be maybe 2.5mm and 2.5mm is about 11awg ? if i am wrong somebody can answer this question
9awg should be 2.9064mm diameter without insulation.

The insulation does look look pretty thin, my caliper is not super accurate but I measure 3.5-4mm with insulation on my phase wires depending how hard I squeeze and what angle I measure from.
 
Your probably making a bigger deal of it then it really is. How far is it from the winding wire, to the phase wire inside the hub, to outside the axle, with some slack of the phase wires inside, lets say its 8" of smaller diameter wire, pick a number like 12awg.
When that 12awg exits the axle and you slap on 10awg or 8awg, how much extra power you not getting vs a continuous strand of 10awg to controller? Loss in heating up that 12awg no doubt, but how much.
You picking up crumbs or you picking up something more substantial?
Be nice to get a bench test out of that. I doubt its much to worry about.

Then consider how much you losing on a cheap connector, if you still want crumbs.
 
Your probably making a bigger deal of it then it really is. How far is it from the winding wire, to the phase wire inside the hub, to outside the axle, with some slack of the phase wires inside, lets say its 8" of smaller diameter wire, pick a number like 12awg.
When that 12awg exits the axle and you slap on 10awg or 8awg, how much extra power you not getting vs a continuous strand of 10awg to controller? Loss in heating up that 12awg no doubt, but how much.
You picking up crumbs or you picking up something more substantial?
Be nice to get a bench test out of that. I doubt its much to worry about.

Then consider how much you losing on a cheap connector, if you still want crumbs.
even if its only 8'' theses tiny wires have a chance to melt if try to push 15kw to them lol , so what i gonna try , is to drill the shaft hole ,
like i always do in past , :LOL:
:ROFLMAO:
 
I was just stating for average people.
All depends for how long at 15kw ;)
You do what you want to do but have fun and be safe.

Whats that white material around the phase/winding connection?

Properly soldered joints are important for your 15kw endevours. My first try I had a rouge winding wire stick out once the soldered cooled because I wasnt prepared. I ended up using locking pliers on the joint to even begin a proper solder job. I kept it on while soldering, which meant more mass to heat up the joint with the pliers. Without that then once the joint is heated up the winding wire comes apart because there is nothing holding it together. Then there is keeping your phase conductor strands inplace as well. My phase strands were ptfe teflon and strands were not thin, not like hobbykings silicone wire, they were quite stiff strands on the teflon wire. Quite the puzzle to play once your ready to solder. You could wrap the joint in smaller, very thin wire with no insulation to keep it intact then that becomes apart of the joint. That is similar to what a normal wire-to-wire inline (flush) connection is to keep no bulge from forming, interlacing the strands.

If you want more length on the windings to solder phases to then what it came with, its got the coating on the winding wire that you must take off for a proper solder joint. Not sure if that proper joint includes extra rosin other then whats in your solder, might not hurt. Building packs and soldering right to the ends (+ and -) and not tabs, some have resorted to extra rosin. I heard people had fun with soldering 26650, cant remember which side was the hardest to attach solder to. Winding wire is a different beast but in the same realm of a bit of knowledge and a bit of skill.
 
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I was just stating for average people.
All depends for how long at 15kw ;)
You do what you want to do but have fun and be safe.

Whats that white material around the phase/winding connection?

Properly soldered joints are important for your 15kw endevours. My first try I had a rouge winding wire stick out once the soldered cooled because I wasnt prepared. I ended up using locking pliers on the joint to even begin a proper solder job. I kept it on while soldering, which meant more mass to heat up the joint with the pliers. Without that then once the joint is heated up the winding wire comes apart because there is nothing holding it together. Then there is keeping your phase conductor strands inplace as well. My phase strands were ptfe teflon and strands were not thin, not like hobbykings silicone wire, they were quite stiff strands on the teflon wire. Quite the puzzle to play once your ready to solder. You could wrap the joint in smaller, very thin wire with no insulation to keep it intact then that becomes apart of the joint. That is similar to what a normal wire-to-wire inline (flush) connection is to keep no bulge from forming, interlacing the strands.

If you want more length on the windings to solder phases to then what it came with, its got the coating on the winding wire that you must take off for a proper solder joint. Not sure if that proper joint includes extra rosin other then whats in your solder, might not hurt. Building packs and soldering right to the ends (+ and -) and not tabs, some have resorted to extra rosin. I heard people had fun with soldering 26650, cant remember which side was the hardest to attach solder to. Winding wire is a different beast but in the same realm of a bit of knowledge and a bit of skill.
 
always new stuff to learn , this is a new motor for me, thank you for the advice , btw i am a average person like anyone :ROFLMAO:
 
Measure resistance from that wire to ground, multimeter set to 20kohm. If the resistance changes with temperature, that's the temperature sensor.

Which actual sensor is installed you would probalby have to open it to see, as it has varied over time. Or "set" the motor to a known temperature (let it sit somewhere at a stable temperature until it has had time (hours) to beocme that temperature all the way thru, then use that as a reference), and measure resistance there. Do that again for a few other temperatures, and you can figure out the temperature curve it is using; there are websites that have formulas to calculate whcih one it is using based on those measurements. like the "Determining the temperature characteristics of an NTC" section of this page Measuring the temperature with NTCs
 
can someone confirm me if the white wire from the hall is the temp sensor thanks
The manufacturer double confirmed its a temperature sensor. I currently run a sensorless controller so I cannot confirm, other than based on what they said. Everything else they said has been true, so I would assume it is in fact a temp sensor.
 
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