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TSDZ2 / 860C shopping list reality check

72510

1 µW
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Nov 14, 2022
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Hi,

I'm looking to build 2x TSDZ2 motor conversions for my bike, and my son's bike. I've done a lot of reading on this forum and elsewhere, so I'm fairly sure I understand what I need, but it'd be great if someone could check that I'm not ordering something incorrectly here. It'd be nice to have the parts for my son's bike before Christmas, so I don't want to mess this up...

The intent is TSDZ2 w/ OSF, using a Bafang 860C.

TSDZ2, w/ 8 pin controller
https://caprouge.com.au/collections/mid-drive-conversion-kits/products/tongsheng-48v-500w-tsdz2-mid-drive-motor-electric-bike-conversion-kit

Bafang 860C display
https://caprouge.com.au/products/bafang-p860c-display

Bafang throttle
https://caprouge.com.au/products/bafang-thumb-throttle

Bafang brake sensors, to suit mechanical brakes
https://caprouge.com.au/collections/parts/products/bafang-in-line-brake-sensors

Bafang programming cable
https://caprouge.com.au/collections/parts/products/bafang-programming-cable-all-bafang-motors

TSDZ2 programming cable
https://cycles.eco/products/tsdz2-motor-firmware-programming-cable-with-6ft-usb-extension?variant=29913404932178

TSDZ2 to 860C, 1T4-style wiring harness
https://cycles.eco/collections/all/products/1t4-w-8-pin-female-connector-conversion-cable-for-tsdz2-w-8-pin-male-connector?variant=42436760830175

There are also the batteries, battery connectors/adapters, thermal pads, crank arm removal tool and bottom bracket removal tool - but I don't think I need to include links for those.

Am I missing anything?

Am I right in saying that to use the 860C display:
* the throttle and brake sensors need to be from Bafang too
* the speed sensor is still from Tongsheng
* the above wiring harness suits the 860C

Any help appreciated, so I don't mess up my son's Christmas!!

Thank you.
 
Have you read here?

imho you miss the bootloader box for flashing the 860C and STlinkV2 for flashing the Tsdz2 controller.

And if you open the motor case for adding thermal pads, think about adding some extra bearings on the spindle too. It is best if you add these when the motor is new and there is no wear yet.
 
Elinx said:
Have you read here?

imho you miss the bootloader box for flashing the 860C and STlinkV2 for flashing the Tsdz2 controller.

And if you open the motor case for adding thermal pads, think about adding some extra bearings on the spindle too. It is best if you add these when the motor is new and there is no wear yet.

+1 on the extra and better (enduro) bearings.
Besides the clutch bearings they are relatively cheap as well :)

Also:
- Thermal sensor (this is really non-optional, do it!)
- Think about grabbing the right speedsensor to also be able to plug in your lights into the ebike motor
 
Don't really "need" the brake sensors or throttle. The TSDZ2 controller is very responsive to the pedal rotation. Stop pedaling and the motor stops power, virtually instantly. On a higher power assist level it takes only a light toe pressure to get lots of motor power, so a throttle is not really needed. A throttle will make the bike a Class 2 which might ban it from many bike paths. Finally, the handlebars get crowded with the +/- buttons on the left and a derailleur shifter on the right with little room to fit in a throttle.

WIthout eBrakes or throttle then you do not need the 1:N splitter cable. But do order the 8 pin harness for the motor if you want to add eBrakes of throttle later along with a 1:4 splitter cable.
 
newRMW said:
Don't really "need" the brake sensors or throttle. The TSDZ2 controller is very responsive to the pedal rotation. Stop pedaling and the motor stops power, virtually instantly. On a higher power assist level it takes only a light toe pressure to get lots of motor power, so a throttle is not really needed. A throttle will make the bike a Class 2 which might ban it from many bike paths. Finally, the handlebars get crowded with the +/- buttons on the left and a derailleur shifter on the right with little room to fit in a throttle.

WIthout eBrakes or throttle then you do not need the 1:N splitter cable. But do order the 8 pin harness for the motor if you want to add eBrakes of throttle later along with a 1:4 splitter cable.

The motor doesn't stop instantly - it ramps down and the speed at which it does that is configurable - and probably varies depending on which osf you're running or if stock fw. I'm pretty convinced brake sensors = longer life nylon/brass gear - by how much depends on how you ride...
 
beemac said:
newRMW said:
Don't really "need" the brake sensors or throttle. The TSDZ2 controller is very responsive to the pedal rotation. Stop pedaling and the motor stops power, virtually instantly. On a higher power assist level it takes only a light toe pressure to get lots of motor power, so a throttle is not really needed. A throttle will make the bike a Class 2 which might ban it from many bike paths. Finally, the handlebars get crowded with the +/- buttons on the left and a derailleur shifter on the right with little room to fit in a throttle.

WIthout eBrakes or throttle then you do not need the 1:N splitter cable. But do order the 8 pin harness for the motor if you want to add eBrakes of throttle later along with a 1:4 splitter cable.

The motor doesn't stop instantly - it ramps down and the speed at which it does that is configurable - and probably varies depending on which osf you're running or if stock fw. I'm pretty convinced brake sensors = longer life nylon/brass gear - by how much depends on how you ride...

The motor stops quicker than the time it takes for me to pull the brake levers. The "de-celeration" parameter in my OSF settings are the default; I never changed it.
 
newRMW said:
beemac said:
newRMW said:
Don't really "need" the brake sensors or throttle. The TSDZ2 controller is very responsive to the pedal rotation. Stop pedaling and the motor stops power, virtually instantly. On a higher power assist level it takes only a light toe pressure to get lots of motor power, so a throttle is not really needed. A throttle will make the bike a Class 2 which might ban it from many bike paths. Finally, the handlebars get crowded with the +/- buttons on the left and a derailleur shifter on the right with little room to fit in a throttle.

WIthout eBrakes or throttle then you do not need the 1:N splitter cable. But do order the 8 pin harness for the motor if you want to add eBrakes of throttle later along with a 1:4 splitter cable.

The motor doesn't stop instantly - it ramps down and the speed at which it does that is configurable - and probably varies depending on which osf you're running or if stock fw. I'm pretty convinced brake sensors = longer life nylon/brass gear - by how much depends on how you ride...

The motor stops quicker than the time it takes for me to pull the brake levers. The "de-celeration" parameter in my OSF settings are the default; I never changed it.

Sure - everyone who doesn't see the point of brake sensors has a reason why they aren't needed - usually specific to the way they ride and not considering all scenarios, but regardless unless you're 100% sure that adding brake sensors doesn't make the bike more reliable then i think it's worth keeping them on the list - esp if it's for a son's bike - that likely needs everything possible to make it more reliable imho :)
 
Piper J3 said:
I would buy TSDZ2B. "B" is improved version with better over-running clutch....

It does not have a "better" clutch, it has a "different" clutch.
This distinction is significant, as far known, its still a cheaply made clutch with a lot of play and with the same low max-torque rating as the original one.

I also want to add to this, that motor has terrible tolerances, including in the clutch and heavily(!) relies on the resistance against tordial loads on the clutch for its rigidity. A chinesium custom-made clutch, with an extra row of moving parts, is a very bad sign from a design perspective.

This is important information, because by moving to this new clutch, they also moved away(!) from internalional standardised clutches. So you cannot replace it with an actually decently made clutchbearing.

Hence I would heavily advice against considering buying the B version over the original, until someone has figured out if the new clutch is actually more durable and/or if there are any commercial (german/japanese) alternatives available.

The improvment "lighter paddling without motor" can just as well be just that "lighter paddling without motor", while sacreficing durability at the same time. We can only say so for certain after more thorough analysis and/or long-term testing. But initial analysis does not look good.
 
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